5 Films Where the Supporting Characters Are Better Than the Heroes Image

With shows like Loki, where the original antagonist became the main character, the Marvel Cinematic Universe has demonstrated how supporting characters can become hugely popular. There are many other films where the supporting cast or a single character steals the show from the lead.

Such characters can be found in a variety of works, whether they are set in the fantastical realm of the Harry Potter series or a heist franchise like The Fast and the Furious. Here are some of our favourite side characters who just might be better than the heroes themselves.

Barry Judd in High Fidelity

Jack Black was typically featured in supporting roles before he became well-known for playing eccentric characters. When he played Barry Judd in High Fidelity, he was catapulted into the major league. Jack Black seems to steal the show every single time.

The main focus of the film is on John Cusack’s character trying to get over his problems with commitment in order to maintain his relationship. However, Black’s portrayal of the eccentric Barry, who sings and dances whenever he feels like it, raises the mood of the film and transforms it into the feel-good comedy it is known for.

Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter series

Although Hermione occasionally acted in a villainous manner in Harry Potter, it was her willingness to go beyond the call of duty that made her interesting. She has more fascinating character evolution and better emotional stakes than any character in the series.

Hermione transforms from a snob to a loyal ally and a key player in the Wizarding War. It’s believed that her relationship with Ron is more satisfying than Harry’s with Ginny. In comparison to Hermione’s more confident persona, Harry came across as a relatively bland protagonist in the films.

Pat Sr. in The Silver Linings Playbook

In the Silver Linings Playbook, a profanity-laced but sincere look at a family dynamic under pressure is shown by this complex father-son bond. The movie starts with Pat Solitano, a bipolar patient, being handed over to his parents after being freed from a mental hospital. Pat’s wife, Nikki, has petitioned the courts for a restraining order against him due to his violent tendencies.

After losing his job, Pat Sr., his father, wants to build a restaurant using the money he made as a bookmaker. The only way Pat Sr. knows how to spend time with his son is to watch football games with him, but he just wants to do so in order to build a stronger relationship with him. This proves to be successful so if you’re looking for a subtle way to bond with a family member who loves sports, you can do so through online bookmakers like PlayUp Australia and practice some moves that you learnt from the movie!

Latrell Spencer in White Chicks

The “A Thousand Miles” scene and “YOU’RE NOT…WHITE?” line ultimately save the movie from its worst parts. They are alluding to the most well-known moment from White Chicks where Latrell fails to grasp that the blonde woman, he believes to be his true love is actually a male.

Terry Crews’ lip-syncing of the song “A Thousand Miles” has made him the face of the tune. In White Chicks, the Wayan Bros’ characters pose as ladies to go undercover, but Latrell is a total pleasure due to his ignorance and goofy demeanour.

Han Leu in The Fast and The Furious: Tokyo Drift

Han was first featured in a supporting role in The Fast and the Furious series that didn’t even feature Dominic Toretto, the main protagonist, at the time. Now, Han is a major character in the series. He became popular thanks to his calm demeanour and fashion sense.

Sean Boswell, the protagonist played by Black, virtually vanished from the series before being recently introduced in F9. Han was regarded as the more suitable candidate to follow because of his enigmatic past and for exhibiting the flair that characters in the series are known to have.

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