The Absurd, Surreal, Metaphysical and Fractured Destiny of Cerebus the Aardvark Image

NEW TO PLEX! Oliver Simonsen’s animated feature, The Absurd, Surreal, Metaphysical and Fractured Destiny of Cerebus the Aardvark must’ve been a Herculean feature to create. The fantasy opens with Cerebus (John Di Crosta), a short, grey fuzzy aardvark with a sword, confronting Necross the Mad (Michael Petranech), an evil wizard bent on destroying the universe. The chain of events leading up to this is told in flashback, where the hero aardvark’s brawl in a tavern brings him to the attention of G’ar and T’ar (Yuell Newsome in a dual role). They lead a splinter group of Pigts, a tribe that awaits the return of a giant pig god.

They hire Cerebus to steal a jewel from the powerful wizard Maki (Stephen Mendel). In his tower with his pet dragon, Maki is using magic to spy on the protagonist’s progress. He sees Cerebus trade in his northern barbarian helmet for a vest to disguise himself as an ordinary merchant. Maki reacts in horror, as the helmet was crucial to Cerebus following his destiny to bring the pig god to life. With destiny now fractured, all sorts of strange characters become embroiled in the turmoil, including Lord Julius (John Di Crosta), Prince Mick (Jim Johnson), Prince Keef (Jim Johnson), and Elrod the Albino (Jeff Seiler). Will the mighty sword of Cerebus be a match for this upside-down world of wizardry?

“…the helmet was crucial to Cerebus following his destiny to bring the pig god to life.”

To say Dave Sim’s Cerebus the Aardvark is just a barbarian fuzzy animal comic book is like saying There Will Be Blood is a movie about digging a lot of holes. While starting as a Conan parody, the sword-wielding aardvark would tackle politics, religion, philosophy, and pop culture over a 300-issue run. A feisty black and white publication started in the late 1970s, the comic helped pioneer the graphic novel format and the creator-owned character concept as well as create a market for independent comics.

Back in the early 90s, I read Film Threat and the Cerebus graphic novels while chugging scotch. Three decades later, I am writing for Film Threat while reviewing the comic’s CGI adaptation. Destiny has been good to me. But what of the destiny of Cerebus? Is The Absurd, Surreal, Metaphysical and Fractured Destiny of Cerebus the Aardvark a faithful adaptation? And why does the convoluted title bury the lead under a mound of adjectives? Well, the reason for the title was to make sure it wouldn’t infringe on an authorized adaptation because Simonsen didn’t have the rights or permission.

The Absurd, Surreal, Metaphysical and Fractured Destiny of Cerebus the Aardvark (2021)

Directed and Written: Oliver Simonsen

Starring: John Di Crosta, Michael Petranech, Yuell Newsome, Stephen Mendel, Jeff Seiler, Jim Johnson, etc.

Movie score: 8.5/10

The Absurd, Surreal, Metaphysical and Fractured Destiny of Cerebus the Aardvark Image

"…Simonsen could do some amazing things with this property..."

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  1. Tue Sorensen says:

    How/where can this film be seen? Has it been released? Is it streaming? Is there a DVD or Blu-ray? I can’t believe you mention none of these things!

  2. Alex Nodopaka says:

    As a long time friend of the Simonsen’s I am very happy for Oliver being rewarded for his 14 year life-investment in his craft.

    BRAVO!!!

  3. Alex Nodopaka says:

    As a long time friend of the Simonsen’s I tremble with happiness about the review. Oliver dedicated 14 years of his life and believed in his craft. I am so happy with him being rewarded for his efforts.

    BRAVO!!!

  4. Priest morgan says:

    While I had ‘nothing to do with the Film itself, Oliver lived on my Street, Sahara Street, at the Journey’s End Mobile Home Park. On October 9, 2017, the Journey’s End was almost totally consumed by the North Bay Wildfires. One side of Sahara Street survived, and Oliver’s home was one of the homes saved. I was one of 4 Fire Fighters involved in saving those homes, mine among them. I found out later from Oliver, that his ‘ONLY’ copy of the Cerebus Movie was in his home. When he told me that we saved the only copy of Cerebus, 14 years and 200 contributing, I felt Very Honored. And now to see the completion of the film, and to see and hear of it bring recognized and talked about publicly, makes my Heart soar with Pride, for Cerebus and for Oliver!!!! You go Pizza Man!!!😊

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